With our winter Basketball Leagues quickly approaching, Social Boston Sports teamed up with Tufts Medical Center’s orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Matthew Salzler, who specializes in Sports Medicine to get answers on some of the most frequently asked questions about avoiding and treating injuries during the basketball season. Dr. Salzler is the team physician for and takes care of athletes at Tufts University, Emerson College, the Quincy Militia (semi-pro football team), Quincy High School,  and was a former assistant physician for the Pittsburgh Steelers.  As a former college rower who has transitioned to salzalertriathlons, he has a personal interest in nearly all sports. Check out all his tips and insights on having a healthy season!
When dealing with people that play basketball, what are the most common injuries you see?
I generally divide injuries in all sports, including basketball, to traumatic injuries and overuse problems.  The most common basketball injuries I see are ankle sprains, ACL tears, and shoulder dislocations.  The most common overuse problem that I see in basketball players is “jumper’s knee” or patellar tendonitis.
For my basketball players, it’s a close tie between knee and ankle injuries with the shoulder injuries being a close third.
When dealing with people that play basketball, what are the most common injuries you see?
I generally divide injuries in all sports, including basketball, to traumatic injuries and overuse problems.  The most common basketball injuries I see are ankle sprains, ACL tears, and shoulder dislocations.  The most common overuse problem that I see in basketball players is “jumper’s knee” or patellar tendonitis.
What do you notice as the most common cause for these injuries? (Whether it be lack of prevention, recklessness, etc.) 
As for the traumatic injuries, unfortunately, bad luck is often the most common reason.  In terms of prevention of both traumatic injuries and overuse problems, keeping your entire body strong is typically the best prevention.  Many athletes have strong arms, chest, and quads with weaker gluts, hamstrings and core muscles.  The best prevention is to focus on any areas of your body that may not be as strong as others.   Additionally, many injuries occur when an athlete is tired and pushing themselves to an extreme as many do in a game.  Keeping yourself aerobically fit and taking breaks when needed can help lower these risks.
 Do you encourage athletes to stretch before play, after, both, and why? 
Stretching after exercise or any other time when your muscles are warmed up (after a run, during yoga, etc), may be able to improve performance, flexibility, and reduce injury. Evidence suggests that stretching before a game doesn’t necessarily decrease injury risk, though there isn’t a downside.  That being said, a light aerobic warm-up and sport-specific activity such as layup drills may be able to improve performance.
What do you suggest to players who suspect they might have a potential injury? 
 Traumatic injuries are more concerning than overuse problems as prompt treatment may be required. If the pain is so severe that the player cannot bear any weight, if you notice a deformity, or if you cannot move a joint normally, I would recommend evaluation in an emergency room or urgently by an orthopedic surgeon. If you don’t have the above or any other emergent concerns, I would initially treat it with with RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation). If the pain persists more than a couple days, if there is any swelling in a joint, or if you have the sense that something is wrong, I would recommend that you make an appointment with an orthopedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine. For many overuse problems, I would recommend a trial of RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation) for 1-2 weeks with a gradual return to activity as pain allows. If that fails and the player is still limited, I would recommend formal treatment by an physician often in conjunction with a physical therapist.
tufts medical center logo
CategoryBlog
Write a comment:

*

Your email address will not be published.

Logo_footer
© 2017 Volo City. All rights reserved.